Life without Anorexia

My motto is
'Dont let the sadness of your past & the fear of your future ruin the happiness of your present'

My life at the moment is completely different to how it once was. I spent 5 years sick with anorexia nervosia and depression as well as struggling with self harm and overexercising. I spent 2 years in different treatment centres.
And since 2012 i have been declared healthy from my eating disorder.

I have been blogging for 7 years, and my whole journey is written in my posts. I now represent healthy and happiness. I want to show anyone struggling that it is possible to recover, no matter how hard it may seem.

I now blog about recovery, my life, veganism and positivity!

If you have any questions leave them in the comment section as i am much quicker at answering there, otherwise you can always send an email: lifewithoutanorexia@hotmail.com

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Cystic Fibrosis

So, many of you wont know what Cystic Fibrosis, CF for short is. Its a chronic illness which is genetic which means your born with it, but that doesnt necessarily mean you know you have it when you're born. For me luckily, the foudn out i ahd CF when i was born.
  When i was born i had Meconium ileus, which is the earliest stools of a baby, having Meconium Ileus os one hte first signs of CF.  So a couple of hours after i was born i was rushed to Emergency Care where i was operated on to have the Meconium removed. Apparently i could have like ied during the procedure, as i was only a few hours old. Which was something i wasnt aware of, i was jsut like... ok i had an operation when iw as born, but now knowing that  could ahve died. It weird, i cant imagine how my mum felt knowing her baby could ahev died.
   I was a month early so i was in an incubator for... i dont know a couple fo weeks or soemthing but because of my CF iahd to spend even more time in hospital ,so wen i was 5 months my family and I moved to Sweden, where my mum is from because the health care is so much better and htey know more about CF.
  So we spent a good couple of months dealing with my CF when we first moved, but after that my CF has been quit good. Just going in maybe once or twice a year fr intravenus antibiotics adn ofcourse the clinics, every month which i go to.
 So when i was nearly five, my parent decided to mvoe back to ireland, being certain that they knew how to dela with the CF. I dont remember much frmo when i lived in Sweden, being so young. 
   So i then grew up in ireland, going to school like a normal ki. I cant really remember if i was sick that often. I know when igot older, i missed alot more school. Which sucked sometimes but others it was quite nice.:)
  
With CF, I have alot of phlegm in my lungs, which is never completely gone, but with the aid of a nebuliser and PLENTY of tablets i can have a  pretty clear chest. My chest has always been pretty good, for some people their CF can be ALOT worse, so i thank God that i dont ahev ti that bad. But when i do get a cold it takes alot longer for me to fight it off, as my body get so tired and my immune system is nto what it should be.
   I can get blocked alot though. Yah nto very nice, but that seems to be the worst for me.
 I also have to take enzymes before all my meals to be alet o digest my food. My body doesnt absorb fat (Greta for an anorexic, right?) But at the start no body trusted me, they didnt believe that i took my Creon, they would watch me rela close. And that was hard, i do admit, for a while id didnt take them, but it wasnt o lose weight, it was because i forget or beacuse im too lazy. Like soemtimes i haveto make it really obivous that im taking hte creon to prove to people that i take them, like sometimes i have to say aloud, "Im taking my Creon now." or i'll ptu the tablets in ym hand and i wont take them until i catch someones eye  and show that im taking them. It does hurt to be mistrusted like that.


With CF though, my life is cut a bit shorter, my life expectancy is only something like 40-60, when i found that out it was a real shock, as when i was little i used to say to my friends that me and hte would eb the oldest women ever!! SO when i found out that with my CF tht isnt possible, it shocked me (not hat i want to be the oldest woman alive.) and after that i started thinking about my future more, and getting quite depressed about it. It was also the fact that nobody talked to me about CF, i ahd to fin out all my information from the internet and plenty of it can be Bullshit. So i didnt know what was true or not.
  But now they're working on something called Gene therapy where they might be able to repair hte gene whcih is the CF gene. I dont know if i would go through with it. I feel CF is something which is part of me, i cant imagine my life wiht out it. But for now i dont know the option with out it.
  
Everyday i  have o do my nebuliser, twice a day and take TOO MANY tablets, but im used to it, i've done it everyday since i was born. Sometimes it gets too much and i jsut have to tell my mum, and then if im lucky, she'll give me a break ,sometimes jsut a day sometimes a week, where i dont take any of my tablets (apart from my Creon) and i dont do my nebuliser, and that keeps me grounded, because then i feel normal ,because so much i haev to put my CF before me, i ahevt o make sure i've done my nebuliser before i go out ot meet friends, i miss things in school, so it sucks big time and it takes alot out of me. But tis something i just deal with and will have to, always. Thats with Anorexia, i know sometime it will be gone and it will just be CF i deal with. I dont need to illnesses.


  
A little more information about Cf for you guys - 

Cystic Fibrosis Symptoms

The symptoms of cystic fibrosis vary from person to person and over time. Sometimes you will have few symptoms. Other times, your symptoms may become more severe.
One of the first signs of cystic fibrosis (CF) that parents may notice is that their baby's skin tastes salty when kissed or the baby doesn't pass stool when first born.
Most of the other signs and symptoms of cystic fibrosis develop later and may include:
  • infections that block the airways that causes frequent coughing;
  • frequent bouts of sinusitis, bronchitis, and pneumonia;
  • pneumothorax;
  • diarrhea;
  • foul-smelling, greasy stools;
  • severe constipation;
  • pancreatitis;
  • rectal prolapse;
  • liver disease;
  • diabetes;
  • gallstones;
  • infertility; and
  • dehydration.

What causes cystic fibrosis?

A defect in the CFTR gene causes cystic fibrosis (CF). This gene makes a protein that controls the movement of salt and water in and out of your body's cells. In people who have cystic fibrosis, the gene makes a protein that doesn't work right. This causes thick, sticky mucus and very salty sweat.
Research suggests that the CFTR protein also affects the body in other ways. This may help explain other symptoms and complications of cystic fibrosis.
More than a thousand known defects can affect the CFTR gene. What type of defect you or your child has may influence how severe cystic fibrosis is. Other genes also may play a role in how severe the disease is.

What are the signs and symptoms of cystic fibrosis?

The symptoms of cystic fibrosis vary from person to person and over time. Sometimes you will have few symptoms. Other times, your symptoms may become more severe.
One of the first signs of cystic fibrosis (CF) that parents may notice is that their baby's skin tastes salty when kissed or the baby doesn't pass stool when first born.
Most of the other signs and symptoms of cystic fibrosis develop later. They are related to how cystic fibrosis affects the respiratory, digestive, or reproductive systems of the body.

Digestive System Signs and Symptoms

Mucus that blocks tubes, or ducts, in your pancreas and prevents enzymes from reaching your intestines causes most digestive system signs and symptoms.
Without these enzymes, your intestines can't fully absorb fats and proteins. This can cause ongoing diarrhea or bulky, foul-smelling, greasy stools. Intestinal blockage also may occur, especially in newborns. Too much gas or severe constipation in the intestines may cause stomach pain and discomfort.
A hallmark of cystic fibrosis in children is poor weight gain and growth. These children are unable to get enough nutrients from their food due to the lack of enzymes to help absorb fats and proteins.
As cystic fibrosis gets worse, other complications may occur, such as:
  • Pancreatitis (PAN-kre-a-TI-tis). This is a condition in which the pancreas become inflamed, which causes pain.
  • Rectal prolapse. Frequent coughing or problems passing stools may cause rectal tissue from inside you to move out of your rectum.
  • Liver disease due to inflamed or blocked bile ducts.
  • Diabetes.
  • Gallstones.

Other Signs, Symptoms, and Complications

Other signs and symptoms of cystic fibrosis are related to an upset of the balance of minerals in your blood.
Cystic fibrosis causes your sweat to become very salty. As a result, your body loses large amounts of salt when you sweat. This can cause dehydration (a condition in which your body doesn't have enough fluids), increased heart rate, tiredness, weakness, decreased blood pressure, heat stroke, and, rarely, death.
Cystic fibrosis also can cause clubbing and low bone density. Clubbing is the widening and rounding of the tips of your fingers and toes. It develops late in cystic fibrosis because your lungs aren't moving enough oxygen into your bloodstream.
Low bone density also tends to occur late in cystic fibrosis. It can lead to a bone-thinning disorder called osteoporosis.

How is cystic fibrosis treated?

Cystic fibrosis (CF) has no cure. However, treatments have greatly improved in recent years. The goals of cystic fibrosis treatment are to:
  • Prevent and control lung infections
  • Loosen and remove thick, sticky mucus from the lungs
  • Prevent or treat blockages in the intestines
  • Provide enough nutrition
  • Prevent dehydration (a condition in which the body doesn't have enough fluids)
Depending on how severe the disease is, you or your child may be treated in a hospital

What is the outlook for cystic fibrosis?

The symptoms and severity of cystic fibrosis vary from person to person. Some people who have cystic fibrosis have serious lung and digestive problems. Other people have more mild disease that doesn't show up until they're adolescents or adults.
The symptoms and severity of cystic fibrosis also vary over time. Sometimes, you will have few symptoms. Other times, your symptoms may become more severe. As the disease gets worse, you will have more severe symptoms more often.
Lung function often starts to decline in early childhood in people who have cystic fibrosis. Over time, permanent damage to the lungs can cause severe breathing problems. Respiratory failure is the most common cause of death in people who have cystic fibrosis.
As treatments for cystic fibrosis continue to improve, so does life expectancy for those who have the disease. Today, some people who have cystic fibrosis are living into their forties, fifties, or older.
Early treatment for cystic fibrosis can improve both your quality of life and lifespan. Such early treatment includes nutritional and respiratory therapies, medicines, exercise, and other treatments.
Cystic Fibrosis At A Glance
  • Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease of your secretory glands, including your mucus and sweat glands. Cystic fibrosis mostly affects the lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, sinuses, and sex organs. It doesn't affect the brain.
  • If you have cystic fibrosis, your mucus becomes thick and sticky. It builds up in your lungs and blocks your airways. This leads to repeated, serious lung infections that can damage your lungs.
  • Lung function often starts to decline in early childhood in people who have cystic fibrosis. Over time, permanent damage to the lungs can cause severe breathing problems.
  • The thick, sticky mucus also can block tubes, or ducts, in your pancreas. As a result, the digestive enzymes that your pancreas makes can't reach your small intestine. Without these enzymes, your body can't absorb fats and proteins. This can cause vitamin deficiency and malnutrition.
  • Cystic fibrosis also causes your sweat to become very salty. As a result, your body loses large amounts of salt when you sweat. This can upset the balance of minerals in your body and cause a number of health problems. Examples include dehydration, increased heart rate, tiredness, weakness, decreased blood pressure, heat stroke, and, rarely, death.
  • A defect in the CFTR gene causes cystic fibrosis. This gene makes a protein that controls the movement of salt and water in and out of your body's cells. Every person inherits two CFTR genes—one from each parent. Children who inherit a faulty gene from each parent will have cystic fibrosis.
  • Children who inherit one faulty gene and one normal gene will be "CF carriers." Cystic fibrosis carriers usually have no symptoms of cystic fibrosis, but they can pass the faulty gene on to their children.
  • About 30,000 people in the United States have cystic fibrosis. It is one of the most common inherited diseases among Caucasians. About 1,000 new cases of cystic fibrosis are diagnosed each year.
  • The symptoms of cystic fibrosis vary from person to person and over time. Sometimes, you will have few symptoms. Other times, your symptoms may become more severe.
  • Doctors diagnose cystic fibrosis based on the results from various tests. Most States screen newborns for cystic fibrosis.
  • Cystic fibrosis has no cure. However, treatments have greatly improved in recent years. Treatment may include nutritional and respiratory therapies, medicines, exercise, and more. Early treatment for cystic fibrosis can improve both your quality of life and your lifespan.
  • If you or your child has cystic fibrosis, you should learn as much as you can about the disease. Ongoing care and lifestyle measures can help you manage the disease.
  • As treatments for cystic fibrosis continue to improve, so does life expectancy for those who have the disease. Today, some people who have cystic fibrosis are living into their forties, fifties, or older.
So thats a little bout CF for you guys.
  but also with ym CF, i need lots more extra calories, like daily i should have between 2500 - 4000 calories. Which should be just for a health Cf person. Which is WAY TOO much. Thinking when i was at home i'd barely have 1000 calories a day. So my meal plan is now much higher than the other because they're taking CF into account, which sucks, but also with ym CF i need to move more, or else hte phlegm will lodge itself even more in my chest and i'll end up with an infection, so i've always been allowed ot move a bit more than the others!! Hehe!!!!!!!!! :)

Here, are some recipes which people with CF should eat, (a we're allowed to ig out on choclate, crisps as much junk food, to keep our weght up, not that it hink thats a good idea. I've never pigged out, maybe before i would enjoy a choclate abr, but i think because i was allowed, i never allowed myself to. )

 Note: This high-calorie recipe is especially for teens with cystic fibrosis (CF). Teens with CF often need to consume additional calories to help them meet their nutritional needs.

Strawberry and Banana Milkshake
Smoothies are a great way to add extra calories and protein to your diet.
Prep time: 10 minutes
Ingredients:
1/2 c. whole milk
1/2 c. heavy whipping cream
1 banana
1 1/4 c. strawberries (fresh or frozen)
3/4 c. lemon sherbet
2 tbsp. dry skim milk powder
Directions:
  1. Combine all ingredients in a blender.
  2. Blend until smooth.
Serves: 2
Serving size: 12 ounces
Nutritional analysis (per serving):    
449 calories
8 g protein
26 g fat
258 mg calcium
70 mg sodium
PB&J French Toast
This interesting twist on the traditional breakfast favorite is easy to make and a great way to start off the day.
Prep time: 20 minutes
Ingredients:
4 slices whole wheat bread
1/4 c. peanut butter
2 tbsp. jelly
2 eggs
1/4 c. heavy cream
3 tbsp. butter
Directions:
1. Spread peanut butter on two slices of bread.
2. Spread jelly on the other two slices of bread.
3. Put one slice of each together to form sandwiches.
4. In a mixing bowl, lightly beat eggs and cream together.
5. Melt butter in large skillet over medium heat.
6. Dip sandwiches in egg mixture, coating well.
7. Place in skillet and brown both sides.
8. Serve immediately.
Serves: 2
Serving size: 1 sandwich
Nutritional analysis (per serving):
703 calories
20 g protein
53 g fat
738 mg sodium
99 mg calcium

Just because i put these recipes, doesnt mean that us CF'rs have this type of food allt he time, but it's jsut an idea of what i should eb eating, but hope to hell that i never do!! Its just awful. :(