Life without Anorexia

My motto is
'Dont let the sadness of your past & the fear of your future ruin the happiness of your present'

My life at the moment is completely different to how it once was. I spent 5 years sick with anorexia nervosia and depression as well as struggling with self harm and overexercising. I spent 2 years in different treatment centres.
And since 2012 i have been declared healthy from my eating disorder.

I have been blogging for 7 years, and my whole journey is written in my posts. I now represent healthy and happiness. I want to show anyone struggling that it is possible to recover, no matter how hard it may seem.

I now blog about recovery, my life, veganism and positivity!

If you have any questions leave them in the comment section as i am much quicker at answering there, otherwise you can always send an email: lifewithoutanorexia@hotmail.com

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Monday, April 24, 2017

Learn what triggers you

Learning what triggers you in life/recovery is one of the things that will make it much easier to cope and stay healthy.

Triggers dont have to be eating disorder related, triggers can be anything... maybe something that makes you feel sad or gives you anxiety or makes you feel bad or just irritates you. I know i have some things which just irritate me and then i know that it is something that triggers that feeling and i try to avoid those triggers as much as possible. But ALSO know how to deal with the irritation when i do get triggered, which is also important. Not just to now what triggers you, but also know how to deal with the response because you cant avoid all triggers in life even if you can try to limit them.

I know for example that if i dont sleep enough that triggers my anxiety and negative thoughts/feelings. But also too much caffeine can trigger panic and anxiety attacks (and when you combine too much caffeine and too little sleep then its an awful result). I also know certain online accounts or different FB groups trigger me to get very irritated so i unfollow them so that i dont have to feel that irritation. Too much stress can also trigger a whole bunch of negative feelings, anxiety, lonliness etc and stress isnt something i can avoid but it is something i have/am learning to deal with to limit the negative response.

Life isnt trigger free even if you can limit them such as if magazines, social media, tv shows or different people can trigger you, then you can limit your access to them or try to avoid the person/people who evoke the negative response. However sometimes it is family members or friends or just things people say without thinking that can upset/anger/irritate (etc) you, then its not so easy to just limit that... you cant control what other people say or their actions, but also sometimes you cant just cut people from your life even if they have a negative impact on you. So then the best thing is to learn to deal with the trigger and learn to cope with your negative response/emotions so that you dont resort to a negative coping mechanism.

Things such as dieting, weightloss, calories, people exercising, people exercising too much, people trying to tell you what to eat, people commenting on your food, people commenting negatively about their body image, people commenting about your body, people spreading false information etc arent things you can avoid... you can try to change the conversation or tell the person to stop but it will still happen sometime or another and if those types of conversations trigger you, then its best to learn to deal with them because you cant control what others say or do.

For example having mantras or mottos to help keep you grounded and not get triggered, trying to change the conversation, trying to leave the room/area if possible. Writing, talking to someone, painting or drawing, taking deep breaths, listening to music, reminding yourself of your goals or why you shouldnt get triggered/bothered.

As mentioned above too little sleep, too much  caffeine, too much stress etc can trigger me. Even going too many hours without food can have a negative effect on me... when i pass the stage of "super hungry" and end up just feeling sick, then i can get this "i dont want to eat..." feeling because i dont feel hungry, but infact i am super hungry and i know i need to eat because i am in a stage of 'hangry' and it wont get better if i dont eat. But its like this barrier and this little trigger.... of course this may not sound good and sound like something disordered, but i know my sister and others can feel this way as well when hunger passes to sick feeling because its gone too long and you just get angry and irritated and everything feels awful (hahah.). So then i do eat it all goes away and i feel fine. But i know that happens if i go too long without food so i always make sure to never get to that stage and have snacks with me to avoid feeling that way. And when i get bouts of anxiety or lonliness or panic then i write or i talk to someone in my family and that helps me cope. Sometimes listening to a podcast and going for a walk or doing baking or cooking also helps me cope, depends on what the trigger was and how strong the response was.

Anyway, this was just a little reminder for you all..... you can try to limit what triggers you, but if you KNOW what triggers you then you can also learn to cope with it when they do happen!!


5 comments:

  1. Has anyone on here, either Izzy or her readers experienced physical health problems alongside their ED? And if so do they resolve themselves/get better as recovery progresses or are you left with lasting, long term problems?
    I ask because this is my second attempt at recovery from my Ed. The first time even though I had ED I was generally well in myself, apart from thinning hair problems and sleep problems - but I had energy to get on with things. When I was almost weight restored I relapsed back down to my pre - recovery weight due to I believe just not being mentally "restored", I wasn't prepared or expecting that side of recovery, I was so busy concentrating on refeeding and getting weight restored that I neglected the physcological side. This time round, thanks mainly to this blog and more further reading I am more prepared and determined this time to do it "properly". The thing is its so much harder this time as I feel so sick and unwell. This saps my spirit somewhat as I thought recovery was when you began to feel better, not worse! And I have a stack of health problems to cope with too which I didn't have before. It would be nice to know if others have experienced problems too and whether or not they lasted post-recovery. Such a lot is written about how to recover but very little when it comes to physical effects of ED.
    I would be so grateful for any advice given. Thank you xxx

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  2. If you go too long without food/between meals why do you loose that feeling of hunger? What causes the body to give out the signal that you don`t want to eat, when the truth of it is that you do and you need to?
    One of the bodies curiosities and I really wondered about this!

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    Replies
    1. It is because your body goes into fight-or-flight mode. It senses an alarming event (starving), and therefore shuts of unnecessary use of energy, like hunger. So that way you'll be able to focus all your energy on solving the problem by a) hunting or b) catabolism. This sounds poorly explained, sorry about that. If you google it, it'll probably find it better explained. The main point it that a stress reaction accurs, which in turn depresses the appetite.

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  3. Triggers for things are all around us and its impossible to avoid them at times. What I have been doing lately is stopping and making a conscious decision to examine my thoughts/feelings and to change them so I am having a different response to something. I ask myself" how can I change the way I am thinking so I can deal with this better" and the more I do this the easier it is becoming.

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